Hong Kong Protests: Civil Liberties Abroad

Airports blocked, fire on the streets, tear gas, and police brutality–this isn’t a 20th century war zone, but rather, a series of mass demonstrations that began in June to protest against the recent Hong Kong extradition bill. This bill would allow Hong Kong citizens to be extradited to mainland China for judicial hearings, despite Hong Kong and mainland China operating on a “One Country, Two Systems” principle that allows Hong Kong to retain autonomy in the legal and judicial spheres. These protests have ignited into chaos on both sides. However, despite China’s claims that the police are the victims, the broader implication of these protests highlight the flaws in mainland Chinese politics.

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Say NO to the New Youth Jail #People’sMoratorium

If you have not already heard, the city of Seattle plans to construct a New Youth Jail. Here is why you should OPPOSE construction and the steps you can take:

Background

    • Original plan: $200-210 million will be allocated to funding a new juvenile detention center in Seattle.
    • 55% of voters approved it in 2012, as it was described as a “Children and Family Justice Center,” which is misleading and prompted voters to cast an approving ballot.
    • Current estimates show that funding the jail will actually cost $225-230+ million, which is significantly more than what was approved.

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The “Right Type” of Student

As an extension to the debate around affirmative action and one of my latest posts, a key issue to address is how college admissions choose their minority students. Studies show that some admissions officers cherry pick how diversity is represented in their post-secondary institution. The main conclusion drawn is that admissions officers are more responsive and favor persons of color who are “deracialized and racially apolitical than they are to those who evince a commitment to antiracism and racial justice,” especially in favor of individuals interested in STEM.

While some would argue that favoring STEM is not a practice that is specific to students of color, that does not excuse admissions officers from dictating who is the right type of minority student.

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Why Affirmative Action Matters

In light of recent lawsuits against Harvard, and the increasing dissent against affirmative action in my own community, I decided to write this very extensive post.

Let’s get a few things straight: I believe affirmative action is a net good system with some current flaws that exist in its current operations. Yes, I am an Asian-American, but my personal identity should not excuse racist or discriminatory beliefs.

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