Hong Kong Protests: Civil Liberties Abroad

Airports blocked, fire on the streets, tear gas, and police brutality–this isn’t a 20th century war zone, but rather, a series of mass demonstrations that began in June to protest against the recent Hong Kong extradition bill. This bill would allow Hong Kong citizens to be extradited to mainland China for judicial hearings, despite Hong Kong and mainland China operating on a “One Country, Two Systems” principle that allows Hong Kong to retain autonomy in the legal and judicial spheres. These protests have ignited into chaos on both sides. However, despite China’s claims that the police are the victims, the broader implication of these protests highlight the flaws in mainland Chinese politics.

Continue reading “Hong Kong Protests: Civil Liberties Abroad”

“China” as the Demonized Other

China is everywhere in today’s headlines, whether it is the trade war, the Chinese government’s assimilation camps for Uyghurs, Xi Jinping’s “dictatorship,” or the conspiracy theories following the mysterious disappearance of Fan Bingbing. No matter the topic, all these articles associate China with the same thing: Communism.

The trope of China as a superpower is far from a new one. After all, China was arguably the most advanced civilization for a thousand years. China as a threat, however, can be traced back to the Chinese Communist Revolution in the 1940’s. Despite economic transformation and the emergence of China as a regional superpower, China is arguably portrayed as even more threatening in contemporary society. Perhaps this proves that America will never be fully willing to allow another country to become the global hegemon; China will always be something Other.

Continue reading ““China” as the Demonized Other”